Sunday, December 30, 2012

Wednesday, December 26, 2012

An Aside--53 Vette "Don Yost Style"


As a Christmas gift to myself I bought Don Yost's "Airbrushing Model Cars" DVD....Yost apparently is an old pro who has won top prize at every model car building contest ever held since the beginning of time. This guy has a pretty different take on airbrushing than the direction I have been going.  For one, he uses (exclusively?) enamel paints from Testors, mixed with laquer thinner, and sprayed through an external mix airbrush.  He makes it look easy....

I didn't want to try this different take on airbrushing on my 60 Vette Gasser project since I had invested too much time in customizing and "engineering"--I saw myself melting the plastic with laquer thinner.  Instead I grabbed up a really old AMT 53 Vette kit I bought at a swap meet for $5, prepped the parts, and started spraying!

The result?  Yost's method is fast, quick, easy, and REALLY REALLY WORKS!  




I had this vision of using his method to knock out the entire project in one rainy December day--builds usually take me weeks....and I might have been able to, but the body proved to be a lot of work.....


The engine is box stock and done....

But the body had the same front and rear valance issues as the Toyota 2000GT, and had to be corrected the same way....putty, sand, putty, prime, sand, etc., but I wanted it done fast, fast, fast!

Yost has you spend a lot of time on prep...that makes sense to me....the body for this "proof of concept" build had been painted previously.....I demonstrated to my 8 year old nephew the joys of airbrushing so it was already painted acrylic blue without any prep; I had to strip off most of the old stuff, sand the mold lines, putty in the valances, and respray with German silver, my final goal being a flat white enamel, covered with a couple of shots of two part automotive clear.

I rushed one of the base coats and the paint ran, so now I am letting it gas out and will sand it smooth and try again.


Yost also recommended taping small parts down to the bench with masking tape and then airbrushing each part, flipping it after a quick dry and hitting it again.  This didn't work as well for me since the paint puddled up and made the final surface coverage a bit dicey.  I will stick to my "alligator clip method" I guess.  Nevertheless the Yost DVD is highly recommended; he takes a difficult topic and breaks it down into simple steps that get the job done fast.  To quote or maybe paraphrase him "this isn't rocket science--those guys wouldn't even let me in the door!"  For this hobby that's the right attitude!



Saturday, December 22, 2012

BMW CARS

BMW CARS

 BMW CARS

  Upcoming new 2013 BMW 5 Series Sedan (520i, 523i 2.5, 528i 2.0, 535i, 550i ) car have 2.0 liter In-line twin turbo engine with 4 cylinder make upto 184 bhp of maximum power and 270 Nm of torque. for performance this car rating 4.5 out of 5 ratings. because this variant touch 100 kmph within only 8 seconds and top speed 225 kmph. fuel consumption is 15 kmpl. All the five series bmw car comes with automatic gear transmission this car have 8 automatic. Fuel tank capacity 71 liter.  

 BMW CARS



 BMW CARS

   

 BMW CARS

 BMW CARS

 BMW CARS

 BMW CARS

toyota car

toyota car

 toyota car

 Toyota Motor Corporation (TMC) will introduce environmentally friendly cars and a number of new concept cars, including compact cars and sports, in the event the Tokyo Motor Show 42nd 2011 at the Tokyo Big Sight in Koto Ward, Tokyo, November 30 through December 11, 2011.

 toyota car


Environmentally friendly car that is ready to be launched officially on Wednesday (30/11) is the Prius PHV (plug-in hybrid)














 toyota car

AP reporter, Nur Hasan Murtiaji, reporting from Tokyo, arena fights the world's leading prestige vehicle manufacturers will be open from Wednesday. The car show will be held for 10 days, which opened to the public from December 2nd until December 11th. Two days earlier, ie 30 November to 1 December will be used as a day of VIP and media.



 toyota car


 toyota car


 toyota car

 toyota car

 toyota car

 toyota car

 toyota car

ferrari car


 ferrari car

ferrari car

 Nothing displays power, elegance, and a rich tradition in automotive history, as does the roaring blur of a Ferrari speeding down the road. When Ferrari first fueled his cars in Monaco for the first edition of the famed Formula 1 World Championship in 1950, a fine tradition and legacy was established. Only a privileged few enjoy the luxury of owning such a fine vehicle. Protecting your Ferrari should come as second nature, as is the case when you protect your child. Having the right kind of car insurance is essential to preserving your Ferrari car. The first step is to call for auto insurance rates. Just because you have a fine, luxury sports vehicle doesn’t mean you have to call for a quote through some company with a golden lining. There are several companies out there that match drivers with policies based on the type of car they own, the type of coverage they want, and their past driving history. Whether you own a vehicle that set you back over 200K, or an economical 15 grand, these companies offer non-biased coverage plans to best suit you as an individual. 

 ferrari car   



 ferrari car



 ferrari car

 ferrari car



 ferrari car

 ferrari car

 ferrari car

 ferrari car

 ferrari car

 ferrari car

 ferrari car

Friday, December 21, 2012

VW classic car

VW classic car

 VW car


 VW has many types for example: frogs, combi, safari, variant, caravelle, new beetle, double cabin, single cabin, dakota, karman gia and much more, VW cars are produced not only in Germany but there is also in Brazil.  


 VW car




 VW car



 VW car



 VW classic car

 VW classic car

 VW classic car

 VW classic car

 VW classic car

 VW classic car

 VW classic car

Sunday, December 16, 2012

A Consideration of Jerome (AZ Ghost Town), Changing Culture and Hillclimb Races



My wife and I recently spent a day in the AZ hill town (also one time ghost town) of Jerome Arizona.  Throughout Jerome, I found evidence of a significant motorcycle and car history.  Viewed through the lens of a large time gap between Jerome’s heyday and now, cultural changes were apparent.

To those of you unfamiliar with Jerome, in the early 20thcentury Jerome was a thriving mining town, that dwindled with changing copper economies and eventually closed up shop in the 50’s.  Following the mines closing, the town was largely abandoned until a collection of free thinkers and free rangers seized upon the opportunity for free housing.  Eventually, the free thinking collection of inhabitants landed upon thinking of capitalism, and the town populated with artisan shops, which now thrive.

As you explore Jerome today you will find several museums and, due to the historic nature of the city, the majority of the remainder of the city can be considered something of a living museum.

Our first stop was the Douglas Mansion.  Around 1900 a second main ore body for copper was found in the Jerome hill and an additional claim/mining operation sprung up largely owned and managed by James Douglas.  Later in the century, after the closing of the mine, the Douglas mansion was donated to the state and now operates as a state park.
The Douglas Mansion with the Powder Box House in front (made mostly of TNT boxes)

Although the majority of the museum was dedicated to mining it quickly became apparent from the placards and pictures that when the miners returned home, they enjoyed motorcycles and cars.

I found peppered throughout the museum motorcycle and car references.  One placard stated that circa 1930, thousands of automobiles were registered to the hillside city.  The candid pictures of downtown in the museum centered around motorcycle clubs, and when they did not, the streets were lined with the automobiles of the time.  To an auto enthusiast, these were fascinating pictures.

One picture was a photo of a young man riding an Indian up the windy city road in approximately 4 inches of mud with a big grin.  The first thing that struck me about the photo is the change in attitude about what constitutes a good time on a motorcycle.  Could you imagine someone on a new street bike smiling as they struggled to make it through town in four inches of mud on a steep incline?  On top of that, consider the ergonomics of that Indian in the mud.  The throttle was on a lever, as was the gearshift, so he couldn’t fully grasp the handlebars at all times.  In addition the handlebars were bent back in a u shape that he held much like you would hold a suitcase you pick up at your side.  The tires were narrow and not much better than bicycle tires. Yet, his smile was ear to ear.  You can almost imagine the novelty and excitement of a bike with a motor when you see his smile. 


I feel the majority of riders today, would be horrified to ride such a contraption, let alone in mud on a steep incline. Why?  My guess is that comfort, safety and convenience have replaced, excitement, novelty, achievement and adventure. 

The young man’s society, especially in Jerome, celebrated machine conquering environment.  Consider some of the races and novels of the time (all celebrated by movies now coincidently): The Great Race of cars around the world, the airplane races from England to France (as seen in Those Magnificent Men and Their Flying Machines), and Around the World in 80 Days.  To see Europe at that time meant a month in a ship at the least, on top of the time it took for your sightseeing.  The world was an adventure around 1900.
A Photo from the 1908 New York to Paris

In comparison, our society now celebrates how easy, fast and luxurious your trip to Europe can be.  Machines conquering environment are soundly looked down upon for environmental impact reasons.  Even in motorcycles, comfort is celebrated; consider Harley’s with their wide leather seats and back rests, reclined seating positions and windscreens.


It isn’t a hard leap to assume that the miners working with mechanical tools all day (jacks, pumps, generators, elevators, rail track, engines, etc.) would be proficient with mechanical objects and might incorporate those skills into their hobbies.  It’s probably similar to our modern computer engineers who go home and play online (either gaming, trying to take down corporate websites, or attempting to steal your bank passwords).

Outside, in the garage of the Douglas mansion, both the old man Douglas chariot (as in horses; used prominently in the film Oklahoma) and the son’s pieced together pickup truck (made from an old car) still reside in the garage.


The Douglas state park also shows a video history of Jerome, on the half hour, and a significant amount of screen time is dedicated to the hillclimb races held in the late 50’s and early 60’s.  After a number of years, the state of Arizona rescinded their decision to allow the races due to safety concerns.

Rather than attempt to describe the exciting event, I’ll leave it to the internet and our instant access to information to fill that role.  I found the blog at the link listed here: 

My consideration of the Ghost City races as quidessential racing cool grew exponentially as I looked at the pictures in the above blog.  Just check out the pictures; how could you not want to be there?!

Did society gain from growing safer with actions such as ending the Ghost City races?  On one hand, people that aren’t racing can’t get hurt racing.  But on the other hand, people that crave adventure and excitement will either find it, or long for it.  If a vast majority of those activities that could be used to fill that need are considered illegal, they are either going to do illegal things (underground late night racing, driving recklessly on public roads, etc.) or long for that excitement and adventure as they recline in their clean, comfortable, safety (perhaps causing a generation of fashion loving moody hipsters?).

But not all is lost.  I’m happy to report that hillclimbs are alive and well in the Northwest.

The Maryhill museum of Art allows groups to rent their hillclimb track. 

Also, the Northwest Hillclimb Association organizes hillclimb events around the state.

Both are great opportunities to enjoy an exciting event.  As soon as I have a car capable of participating, I’m going to give it a shot.

Other gearhead highlights of Jerome included:

The old auto dealership has an old plymouth jammed into it amongst the shops.  As my wife purchased artisan necklaces I read through the signs on the wall chronicling the old dealership (and how they placed cars in the shop).

The mid-town museum also has more detail about the Ghost City races as well as a really cool old bicycle.




I will note, that it was interesting to me that, although the gearhead culture was one of the predominant historical references to the town of Jerome in picture, both the Douglas and mid-city museum chose to focus on the prostitution that existed in the town, although there seemed to be far fewer pictures and details available for those exhibits.  It’s interesting what we celebrate as a society.  Also in Jerome, it seemed that in every bookstore we walked in there were novels written about, or from the point of view of, a Jerome prostitute.  Yet I didn’t see as much as a poem about any of the gentlemen smiling with their motorcycles, pulling their new car our of the dealership, or screaming up the hill in their Austin Healey.

I think this micro look at the celebrated prostitution history of Jerome also matches the macro view of America’s history.  Although we all know that celebrated men who believed in God helped guide this country, now the belief in God is generally derided in film, and characters such as Billy the Kid, Bonnie and Clyde, the Texas Chainsaw Massacre, and etc. are celebrated.

I can’t help that wonder if we are seeing the effects of the seeds we’ve sown as mass shootings rock the nation this week. I think it’s foolish to be surprised when evil expands its presence when it's been invited into entertainment.  How my soul longs for men and women to know the joy, goodness, love, justice and righteousness of Christ.  He stands against all of this that breaks your heart, and He can change those hearts that anti-depressants and counseling can’t.

My apologies for the side comment, it’s been a tough week and it’s hard to not drift back to thoughts regarding the tragedies, especially when one of them occurred in your city (Portland, OR).

Back to Jerome.

At the top of the hill, the old asylum now houses both a Packard limo (with an interesting wheel chair access setup) and a Rolls Royce Phantom.  Little detail is given as to why the vehicles are there, or where they came from and internet searches have provided little information.  I would love to hear if someone knows more about these vehicles.  If your taste in gears expands beyond transportation, there are some neat antique clocks in the hallways of the hotel.


Packard Photos 


Rolls Royce Phantom 

A local antique shop has ean arly 20th century gas pump decorating it’s sidewalk in a patina only the Arizona desert could produce.
 

Also, the vehicles that are used in the city reflect the history.  A local mine museum advertises with a vintage water truck.  I noted a local deliveryman using a very odd, interesting flatbed Jeep I’d never seen before doing. A little internet research told me it's a FC (forward control).
 
Jeep FC

If your tastes run more modern, Jerome is still the hill of choice for rich men and their exotica.  I’ve seen more than one supercar parked along the streets of Jerome, no doubt driven up from snooty southward Scottsdale.

The city of Jerome is a fascinating place for people that enjoy machines.  I’d highly recommend a visit.  But the space of 100 years also reveals some cultural differences, even in the context of motorcycles and cars, between now and then.